I have drafted an eco-evolutionary approach to biogeography (Fig. 1, Gray et al 2015) which I am applying to the distribution of aquatic plants in Britain. For this I have produced a phylogenetic tree down to species level for 164 species of aquatic vascular plants and a new set of species traits to completely revise my first synthesis (Willby et al 2000). My ambition is to link biogeography to ecosystem functioning. This work is in preparation with Richard Gornall (University of Leicester, England) and Alessandro Gimona (The James Hutton Institute, Scotland).

Figure 1. Co-evolution of species distribution generates diversity patterns in species (grids), species traits (symbols) and phylogeny (trees). From a hypothetical null model (e.g. random assemblage) and species pool at regional scale, species are sorted through the effects of niche assembly (heterogeneity of resources, trophic interactions) and species dispersal into patterns of local species distribution. Over time, local extinction, colonisation and speciation alter the regional species pool and associated phylogeny and trait diversity. The three dimensions of diversity (taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic) determine the dynamics of ecosystem functions and services. Note the diversity patterns may also be dependent on the scale of observation (resolution).

Figure 1. Co-evolution of species distribution generates diversity patterns in species (grids), species traits (symbols) and phylogeny (trees). From a hypothetical null model (e.g. random assemblage) and species pool at regional scale, species are sorted through the effects of niche assembly (heterogeneity of resources, trophic interactions) and species dispersal into patterns of local species distribution. Over time, local extinction, colonisation and speciation alter the regional species pool and associated phylogeny and trait diversity. The three dimensions of diversity (taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic) determine the dynamics of ecosystem functions and services. Note the diversity patterns may also be dependent on the scale of observation (resolution).